Ole Larson's Folks

Category: Prison

In 1841, when Anne Larsdatter was imprisoned there, and gave birth to Ole, Oslo Prison (Kristiania Tukthus) was located at #33 Storgata (“main street”), less than a mile from the present-day Oslo Central train station. The front entrance may have looked much  as it does in this 1910 photo (courtesy digitalarkivet). After returning home, I got a link to oslobilder.no, “the official website for historic images from Oslo.” By searching the term “tukthuset,” (the prison) I got 49 photos, including the…

From the Regional State Archive of Hamar, I received the earliest sentencing document in the case of great-great-grandma Anne Larsdatter. In a way, it is anticlimactic, in that most of the facts have already come out in later documents already uncovered. Still, there may be new clues here, and work is just beginning. The document was issued by the Sorenskriver (magistrate) of south-Gudbrandsdal, Herman Møinichen, on 01 June 1840. For background, you can read the later appeals court documents, from…

I am working on a “page” consolidating  several posts about my second great-grandmother, Anne Larsdatter. Unlike my earlier pages, I plan to do some editing and revisions this time. In the meantime, follow the links below for more pieces of the story. Norway experienced a population explosion in the early 1800’s, especially among the poor, rural husmann class. This was due to several factors, and despite the fact that virtually all arable land was already being farmed. Smallpox vaccine (made…

As I hinted in the previous post, there is a question that has nagged at me ever since I learned that Ole Larson’s birth on Dec. 10, 1841 took place in Oslo Prison. The two court documents I now have in my possession, and the prison records summarized for me by an Oslo archivist, have done nothing to clarify the issue. With “cooling time” of 170 years and the passing of three or more generations, I hope it is not…

It has been a good many months since cousin Myrna (tusen takk, fetter) retrieved for me a certain court document from the Oslo regional archive, namely the sentence of the Stiftsoverret (something like a mid-level appeals court) against our great-great-grandmother, Anne Larsdatter Skurdalshaugen, dated 17 August, 1840. It was an extremely tough nut to crack. Here is a typical example of the handwriting:To view the complete document, click here. I finally asked a professional genealogist in Sweden to transcribe the…

I have finally coaxed some key details from the handwritten version of Anne Larsdatter’s sentence by the Høyesterret (Supreme Court). “Tusen Takk” (a thousand thanks) to Else Rustad of the Norwegian Genealogical Society for transcribing portions of the document into emailable Norwegian, and to Berit Carlsen of Bend for translating. It was no easy task, as you can see from this excerpt: Below is a complete list of the items Anne was convicted of stealing, in cooperation with two other…

1 2